FAQs

Below, please find a list of incredibly common questions I've compiled from emails and comments. Still stumped? Feel free to shoot me an email at amanda@chubbyveganmom.com and I promise to do my best to help you figure it out!

What is a "Ve-Gan?" A vegan is a person who leads a compassionate lifestyle. We refrain from eating or wearing anything that comes from or is made from an animal and we won’t use anything tested on them. An example of things we avoid include: dairy, eggs, meat, gelatin, honey, leather and wool. 


Why don't you drink milk? There are a PLETHORA of reasons drinking milk is unnecessary nutrition wise and far, far more for moral ones. Rather than force-feeding all the not-so-pleasant details to you, I encourage you to find out for yourself why you should put the dairy BACK on the shelf.


So then what's so wrong with wool? Vegans believe no animal was put on this Earth to be used for human consumption, entertainment or goods. This includes things like dairy and wool, which while the animal is not necessarily slaughtered to obtain the goods, it does result in an invasion of their right to a purpose-free life.

My cousin, sister, best friend from college is a vegan, but she wears leather, how come? Well, said person is in fact, not a vegan, but a vegetarian. There are a few different kinds of eaters out there, but to simplify it, there are vegans and then there's everyone else. Veganism involves not only a diet change, but a complete lifestyle alteration as well (including eradicating leather and animal-tested items from said life). A vegetarian is someone who follows a vegan diet (excludes all animal products), but still uses animals in other aspects of their life. In addition to these types, there are lacto (dairy), ovo (eggs) and pesce (fish) tarians who are somewhat relatives of the vegan family.

AND no, not eating red meat, but still eating fish and chicken DOES NOT make you a vegetarian. It simply makes you someone that doesn't eat red meat.

What is a Pearyn? A 'Pearyn' is in fact not an 'a.' Pearyn is our darling little daughter and if you must know, is a shortened form of Perigrinne, which means "wanderer."

What makes you a "chubby" vegan? Please take a gander at the Mighty Chubby Disclaimer I've kindly and thoughtfully penned. If you still don't get it, google pictures of vegan girls, then, look at me.

So what's the big deal with being a vegan mom? Well, other than the fact that nearly everyone I explain our diet to thinks I'm trying to malnourish and kill my child, a whole bunch. Because of our dedication to creating a cruelty-free family, there are a few normal traditions that will inevitably have to be tweaked to be animal-lover friendly. Some of these include: birthday parties, trick-or-treating, Thanksgiving, school lunches, summer camp and the mere act of raising an independent, free-thinking little human being.

What ARE you going to do about Halloween, birthday parties, etc? While I'd love to say I had all the answers, these types of questions aren't ones that can be easily figured out. Instead, we've mapped out our approaches to some of the problems we know might arise and we'll adjust as we see fit. Ultimately, these trials and tribulations will be part of our journey and we're inviting you to join us as we make it happen.

What if your child doesn't want to be a vegan? Well, what if your child wants to eat ice cream sundaes all day every day, do you let them? Until Pearyn is old enough to make a responsible decision regarding diet and nutrition for herself, we'll do everything we can to provide an incredibly healthy vegan life for our little girl. When the time comes and she is able to make her own choices, if she selects wrong we'll exile her. Kidding. We will work something out. We have no intentions of forcing our lifestyle on anyone, including our offspring.

But, isn't that what you're doing? Forcing them to be vegan? We've decided to raise our children as vegans from conception because in the event they want to continue their vegan path, they'll have had the opportunity to do that since the womb. And in the event they grow up and want to eat cheeseburgers all day, every day, then living a cholesterol-free life through their teenage years is at least going to postpone all that artery clogging for a little bit.

What's with the cupcakes? I'm a really big fan of baking. I'm an even bigger fan of baking vegan cupcakes for friends, family and sometimes strangers just to prove to them how delicious AND possible dairy-free and egg-free baking can be.

And trust me, it is.

7 comments:

  1. I love your responses! And I too and a vegan mommy (3 kiddos) who think I can win over the world with awesome vegan cupcakes! I cant wait to try some of yours out!

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  2. as far as imposing beliefs onto your kids, it's what ALL parents do. Christians raise their children as Christians, Muslims as muslims, Hindus as Hindus, omnivores as omnivores. It's your right as a parent to raise your children according to your belief system.

    as far as some vegans wearing leather - they may be transitioning vegans too. i can't afford to replace all my shoes, belts, jackets, etc with compassionate ones right away. These items get replaced as they get too old and worn to be useful anymore. Someone shouldn't be judged for wearing leather or wool goods and being vegan when it simply could be that they are new and need time to replace their old things with new vegan ones.

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    1. I completely understand what you're saying and should probably be more clear in that I get tired of hearing people say they're "dietary" vegans. There is no such thing. Being vegan isn't a DIET, it's a lifestyle. It encompasses personal products, entertainment and the things you wear and use. So in reality, this is more what that was geared toward. :)

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  3. Made this tonight for dinner and it was AFriggnMazing. Bow down to this recipe!
    I halfed the sugar and switched it to cane crystals and kiddos still drooled over it...gracias!

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  4. Do you have recommendations for pet food brands or recipes?
    Thanks!

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  5. When you were keeping track of your daughters diet in 2011 for the nutritionist how old was she? I saw your link on baby center looking for answer for my son who is 1 year old. Love your blog.

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    1. We've taken both of our children at ages one and two to evaluate their diets. One was crucial since they had so much food in their diets at that point. Our family doctor also ran a couple extra blood tests at one, two and three just to make sure all their levels were where we wanted them to be (iron, etc). Just things we did to give ourselves peace of mind ;)

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